ICIAM announces prizes for 2011

September 23, 2010

Awards of five prizes to be presented at the 2011 meeting of the International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM) in Vancouver, British Columbia, have been announced. Professor Rolf Jeltsch, President of ICIAM, announced the prize recipients on Monday.

Professor Emmanuel J. Candès of Stanford University is the recipient of the 2011 ICIAM Collatz Prize. He is being acknowledged for his exemplary work in numerical solution of wave propagation problems and compressive sensing, in addition to anisotropic extensions of wavelets. Candès is a professor of mathematics and statistics at Stanford University, on leave from the department of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. A recipient of many awards, including most recently, SIAM's George Pólya Prize, Candès is well known for his revolutionary research in the digital representation of wave signals and harmonic analysis. Funded by ICIAM member society GAMM, the Collatz Prize recognizes individual scientists under age 42 worldwide for outstanding research work in industrial and applied mathematics, and carries a cash award of $1000.

The 2011 ICIAM Lagrange Prize is awarded to Professor Alexandre J. Chorin of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for his fundamental and original contributions to applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and turbulence modeling. Chorin was among the first to develop an algorithm for the numerical solution of Incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. Chorin is a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, and a senior scientist with the Mathematics Group of Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division. The Lagrange Prize recognizes mathematicians for career-long contributions to applied mathematics and carries a cash award of $3000. It is funded by three member societies: SMAI, SEMA and SIMAI.

Professor Vladimir Rokhlin of Yale University has been selected as the recipient for the ICIAM Maxwell Prize in 2011. He is being recognized for his research in the area of fast multipole methods. His research has revolutionized the field of numerical electromagnetism for radar and molecular dynamics for chemistry, among others. A 2009 SIAM fellow, Rokhlin is Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at Yale University. Some of his noteworthy research accomplishments are in the areas of analysis-based fast algorithms, inverse scattering and approximation theory. Initiated and funded by ICIAM member society IMA, the Maxwell Prize is awarded for demonstrated originality in applied mathematics and carries a cash award of $1000.

The 2011 ICIAM Pioneer Prize goes to Professor James Albert Sethian of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is being recognized for the wide-ranging impact of his research on areas such as medical imaging and geophysics. Sethian has developed algorithms for medical scanning devices in imaging workstations; developed tools to solve equations that have applications in geophysics and tomography; and created accurate numerical methods of drop dynamics in inkjets. Sethian is a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, and also heads the Mathematics Group of Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division. First awarded in 1999, the Pioneer Prize was established, fittingly, for pioneering work introducing applied mathematical methods and scientific computing techniques to an industrial problem area or a new scientific field of applications. Carrying a cash award of $1000, the prize is funded by SIAM, an ICIAM member society.

Professor Edward Lungu of the University of Botswana will be awarded the ICIAM Su Buchin Prize for mathematical models developed by him for problems related to Africa, in addition to his significant contributions in developing teaching, research and organizational structures for applied mathematics in Southern Africa. Lungu is currently a professor of mathematics at the University of Botswana. He has been described as a "fundamental person" in the development of teaching and research in applied mathematics in Southern Africa, owing in part to his role as founder and leader of the Southern Africa Mathematical Sciences Association (SAMSA), and later of the African Mathematics Millennium Science Initiative (AMMSI), better known as the Millennium Initiative. Funded by member society CSIAM, the Su Buchin Prize--carrying a cash award of $1000--provides international recognition of outstanding contributions in applied mathematics made by individuals to emerging economies and human development, particularly at the economic and cultural level in developing countries.


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