2006 Prizes and Awards Luncheon
SIAM Annual Meeting
July 11, 2006

Prizes, awards, and special lectures are shown in alphabetical order.

I. E. Block Community Lecture

The I. E. Block Community Lecture was instituted in 1995 to encourage public appreciation of the excitement and vitality of applied mathematics by reaching out as broadly as possible to students, teachers, and members of the local community, as well as to SIAM members, researchers, and practitioners in fields related to applied and computational mathematics.  The lecture is open to the public and is named in honor of I. Edward Block, a founder of SIAM who served as its Managing Director for nearly 20 years.

2006 Lecturer:     Simon A. Levin
                          Princeton University

Title of Lecture:   Individual Choices, Cooperation and the Global Commons: Mathematical
                         Challenges in Uniting Ecology and Socioeconomics for a Sustainable
                         Environment
                          Wednesday, July 12, 6:15 - 7:15 p.m.
                          The Castle at Park Plaza
Photo: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky with I.E. Block Community Lecturer, Simon Levin     

Simon Levin received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1964 and joined the faculty of Cornell University. In 1985, he was appointed the Charles A. Alexander Professor of Biological Sciences at Cornell. In 1992, he joined the faculty of Princeton University as the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology. He is the founding director of the Princeton Environmental Institute. He is a member of the U. S. National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received numerous honors and awards, most recently (2005) receiving the prestigious Kyoto Prize awarded by the Inamori Foundation.

Levin is a theoretical ecologist who examines the dynamics of populations and communities; spatial heterogeneity and problems of scale; evolutionary ecology; and the application of ecological principles to achieving a sustainable future for humanity.  He is especially interested in the self-organization of ecosystems from individual interactions, and in the interface between ecology and economics.

Previous Lecturers:  

*The I. E. Block Lecture (Phillip A. Griffiths and William F. Ballhaus, Jr.) was merged with the Community Lecture (Charles Van Loan and Brian Rosen) in 1997.

The I. E. Block Community Lecturer receives a $1,500 honorarium and an engraved clock.

 

Julian Cole Lectureship

Established in 2001 with funds contributed by the students, friends, colleagues, and family of Julian Cole, the prize is awarded for an outstanding contribution to the mathematical characterization and solution of a challenging problem in the physical or biological sciences, or in engineering, or for the development of mathematical methods for the solution of such problems.  The lectureship may be awarded to any member of the scientific or engineering community.


2006 Lecturer:    Michael J. Shelley
                         Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences
                         New York University

Title of Lecture:   Bodies Interacting With and Through Fluids
                          Wednesday, July 12, 3:00 - 3:30 p.m.
                          Imperial Ballroom
Photo: Julian Cole Lecturer Michael Shelley accepts his certificate from SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

Citation:  Michael J. Shelley's work, like that of Julian D. Cole, whom we honor, emphasizes mathematical modeling and scientific computation in fluid dynamics and other fields.  He has worked collaboratively with many individuals, making significant advances in our understanding of basic phenomena from multicomponent fluids and multiphase materials to neuronal activity in the visual cortex.

Michael J. Shelley received his B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Colorado in 1981, and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Arizona in 1985.  He was then a postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University, following which he joined the mathematics faculty at the University of Chicago and where he was also an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow.  In 1992, he joined the Courant Institute at New York University, where he is presently Professor of Mathematics and Neuroscience, and Co-Director of the Applied Mathematics Laboratory.  He was previously an NSF Presidential Young Investigator, and received the Francois N. Frenkiel Award of the American Physical Society, Division of Fluid Dynamics, in 1998.  His research interests include the mathematical modeling, analysis, and simulation of flow-body interactions and of complex fluids, often done in close connection with laboratory studies, as well as in understanding elements of visual perception, again using modeling and simulation, of the neuronal network dynamics of the primary visual cortex.

Previous Lecturer:   

The Julian Cole Lecturer receives a cash prize of $1,000 and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate. 

 

George B. Dantzig Prize 

The prize, established in 1979, is awarded jointly by the Mathematical Programming Society (MPS) and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The prize is awarded for original research, which by its originality, breadth and scope, is having a major impact on the field of mathematical programming.

2006 Recipient:             Éva Tardos
                                    Cornell University
Photo: Éva Tardos, recipient of the George B. Dantzig Prize, with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

Citation:  For her deep and wide-ranging contributions to mathematical programming, including the first strongly polynomial-time algorithm for minimum-cost flows, several other variants of network flows, integer programming, submodularity, circuit complexity, scheduling, approximation algorithms, and combinatorial auctions.

Éva Tardos received her Ph.D. at Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary in 1984.  After teaching at Eötvös and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. she joined Cornell in 1989.  She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, an ACM Fellow, was a Guggenheim Fellow, a Packard Fellow, a Sloan Fellow; an NSF Presidential Young Investigator; and has received the Fulkerson Prize in 1988.  She is the editor of several journals including SIAM Journal on Computing, Journal of the ACM, and Combinatorica

Tardos’ research interest focuses on the design and analysis of efficient methods for combinatorial-optimization problems on graphs or networks.  Such problems arise in many applications such as vision, and the design, maintenance, and management of communication networks.  She is mostly interested in fast combinatorial algorithms that provide provably optimal or close-to optimal results.  She is most known for her work on network-flow algorithms, approximation algorithms for network flows, cut, and clustering problems.  Her recent work focuses on algorithmic game theory, an emerging new area of designing systems and algorithms for selfish users.

Previous Recipients:     

The recipient of the George B. Dantzig Prize receives $4,000 and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

 

Richard C. DiPrima Prize

Established in 1986, the prize is awarded to a young scientist who has done outstanding research in applied mathematics (defined as those topics covered by SIAM journals) and who has completed his/her doctoral dissertation and completed all other requirements for his/her doctorate during the period running from three years prior to the award date to one year prior to the award date.

The prize, proposed by Gene H. Golub during his term as SIAM President, is funded by contributions from students, friends, colleagues, and family of the late Richard C. DiPrima, former SIAM President.

2006 Recipient:    Xinwei Yu
                           California Institute of Technology

                           Currently:  CAM Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics
                                            University of California, Los Angeles
Photo: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky presents the Richard C. DiPrima Prize to Xinwei Yu

Citation:  For his dissertation, “Localized Non-Blowup Conditions for 3D Incompressible Euler Flows and Related Equations," in which he obtains new necessary conditions for blowup of solutions of the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations.

Xinwei Yu is currently CAM Assistant Professor at University of California, Los Angeles. He received his Ph.D. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from California Institute of Technology in 2005, an M.S. in Computational Mathematics and a B.S. in Mathematics from Peking University, China, in 2000 and 1997, respectively. His research interests are in singularity problems in fluid dynamics and related problems.

Previous Recipients: 

There was no award given in 1990.

The recipient of the Richard C. DiPrima Prize receives $1,000 and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

 

AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture

Established in 2002, this lecture is given annually at the SIAM Annual Meeting.  The lecture is intended to highlight significant contributions of women to applied or computational mathematics.

2006 Lecturer:     Irene Fonseca
                          Carnegie Mellon University

Title of Lecture:   New Challenges in the Calculus of Variations

Monday, July 10, 3:00 - 3:30 p.m.
                          Imperial Ballroom
Photo: Irene Fonseca (center) poses with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky and AWM President Barbara Keyfitz

Citation:  In recognition of her fundamental contributions and leadership in analysis and applied mathematics, especially in nonlinear partial differential equations and the calculus of variations.  With applications from materials science to image reconstruction, her work includes nearly 100 papers which have set new directions and challenges.  Her notable service record includes boards of several major institutes, international meetings, and publication and professional societies.  She has initiated programs to attract young researchers, and her former postdocs and students can be found at distinguished institutions.  She is an inspiration to the entire mathematics community, especially to the women's mathematics community.

Irene Fonseca is the Director of the (NSF funded) Center for Nonlinear Analysis in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University, whose primary focus is the nonlinear behavior of novel man-made materials and related issues in analysis and computation. Her research program includes the mathematical study of shape memory alloys, ferroelectric, magnetic and magnetostrictive materials, composites, liquid crystals, thin films, phase transitions, and image segmentation in computer vision. She received her undergraduate degree in Mathematics from the University of Lisbon, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. In 1997, she received the Grande Oficial da Ordem Militar de Sant'Iagoda da Espada, bestowed by the President of Portugal, and, in 2004, the Women of Distinction Award in Mathematics and Technology.

Previous Lecturers:  

The AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecturer receives a certificate signed by the Presidents of AWM and SIAM.

 

Lagrange Prize in Continuous Optimization

The prize, established in 2002, is awarded jointly by the Mathematical Programming Society (MPS) and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The prize is awarded for outstanding works in the area of continuous optimization. Judging of works will be based primarily on their mathematical quality, significance, and originality. Clarity and excellence of the exposition and the value of the work in practical applications may be considered as secondary attributes.

2006 Recipients:  Roger Fletcher, University of Dundee, Scotland
                           Sven Leyffer, Argonne National Laboratory
                           Philippe L. Toint, University of Namur, Belgium

                                                        for the papers:      

                           Nonlinear Programming Without A Penalty Function
                           Roger Fletcher and Sven Leyffer
                           Mathematical Programming, 91 (2), pp. 239-269 (2002)

                                                                and

                           On the Global Convergence of a Filter-SQP Algorithm
                           Roger Fletcher, Sven Leyffer, and Philippe L. Toint
                           SIAM Journal on Optimization, Volume 13, pp. 44-59 (2002)
Photo: Lagrange Prize recipients Philippe Toint and Sven Leyffer (center) pose with selection committee chair Michael Todd (left) and SIAM President Martin Golubitsky. Prize recipient Roger Fletcher is not pictured

Citation: In the development of nonlinear programming over the last decade, an outstanding new idea has been the introduction of the filter.  This new approach to balancing feasibility and optimality has been quickly picked up by other researchers, spurring the analysis and development of a number of optimization algorithms in such diverse contexts as constrained and unconstrained nonlinear optimization, solving systems of nonlinear equations, and derivative-free optimization.  The generality of the filter idea allows its use, for example, in trust region and line search methods, as well as in active set and interior point frameworks. Currently, some of the most effective nonlinear optimization codes are based on filter methods.  The importance of the work cited here will continue to grow as more algorithms and codes are developed.

The filter sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method is proposed in the first of the two cited papers. Many of the key ideas that form the bases of later non-SQP implementations and analyses are motivated and developed. The paper includes extensive numerical results, which attest to the potential of the algorithm.

The second paper complements the first, using novel techniques to provide a satisfying proof of correctness for the filter approach in its original SQP context.  The earlier algorithm is simplified, and, in so doing, the analysis plays its natural role with respect to algorithmic design.

 Previous Recipient: 

The recipients of the Lagrange Prize in Continuous Optimization receive $1,500 and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

 

George Polya Prize

The George Polya Prize, established in 1969, is given every two years, alternately in two categories: (1) for a notable application of combinatorial theory; (2) for a notable contribution in another area of interest to George Polya such as approximation theory, complex analysis, number theory, orthogonal polynomials, probability theory, or mathematical discovery and learning.  In 2006, the George Polya Prize is given for a notable contribution in another area of interest to George Polya.

2006 Recipients:  Gregory F. Lawler
                           Cornell University

                           Oded Schramm
                           Microsoft Corporation

                           Wendelin Werner
                           Université Paris-Sud, France
Photo: Pictured with their Polya Prize medals are (from left) Gregory Lawler, Wendelin Werner, and Oded Schramm with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

Citation: For their groundbreaking work on the development and application of stochastic Loewner evolution (SLE).  Of particular note is the rigorous establishment of the existence and conformal invariance of critical scaling limits of a number of 2D lattice models arising in statistical physics.

Gregory F. Lawler received his B.A. from University of Virginia in 1976 and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1979.  He went to Duke University in 1979, where he was named A. Hollis Edens Professor of Mathematics in 2001.  Also, in 2001,  he became Professor of Mathematics at Cornell University and this fall will start a new position as Professor of Mathematics at the University of Chicago.  His research interests are random walk and Brownian motion with a particular emphasis on processes with strong interactions arising in statistical physics.

Oded Schramm is a principal researcher working at Microsoft Research.  He earned his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in mathematics at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and his Ph.D. in mathematics at Princeton University (advisor W. P. Thurston).  After a two-year appointment at the UCSD, he returned to Israel to work at the Weizmann Institute of Science.  In 1999, he joined Microsoft Research at Redmond, Washington.  He is the recipient of the Anna and Lajos Erdös Prize in Mathematics, the Salem Prize, Clay Research Award, Henri Poincaré Prize, and the Loeve Prize.  Dr. Schramm’s research interests include conformal mappings and probability.
 
Wendelin Werner is Professor of Mathematics at the Université Paris-Sud. He completed his Ph.D. at Université Paris VI under the supervision of Jean-Francois Le Gall. His research interests lie in probability theory and especially in two-dimensional structures. For his research, he has received prizes from the French Academy of Sciences, from the European Mathematical Society, as well as the Rollo Davidson, Fermat and Loeve prizes.

Previous Recipients: 

The recipients of the Polya Prize receive a $20,000 cash award and engraved medals.

 

W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize

The W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize in Mathematics was established by SIAM in 1993 to recognize outstanding work in, or other contributions to, the broadly defined areas of differential equations and control theory.  The prize, given annually, may be awarded either for a single notable achievement or a collection of such achievements.  The prize fund was endowed by the late Mrs. Idalia Reid to honor her husband.

2006 Recipient:   Peter Kloeden
                          Johann Wolfgang Goethe University
                          Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Title of Lecture:   Random Attractors and the Preservation of Synchronization in the Presence of Noise
                           Thursday, July 13, 3:00 – 3:30 p.m.
                           Imperial Ballroom                  
Photo: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky and W.T. and Idalia Reid Prize recipient Peter Kloeden

Citation:  For his fundamental contributions to the theoretical and computational analysis of differential equations.

Peter Kloeden graduated with a B.A. (with First Class Honours) in Mathematics from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.  He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Queensland in 1975 under the supervision of Rudolf Vyborny.  In 1995, he also received a Doctor of Science in Mathematics from the University of Queensland.  After 20 years of teaching at various universities in Australia, he was appointed in 1997 to the Chair in Applied and Instrumental Mathematics at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main as successor to Friedrich Stummel.  He has had research sabbaticals at California Institute of Technology, The Pennsylvania State University and the Universities of Bremen, Florence, and Sevilla.  From 1993-95, he was a member of the Mathematics and Physical Sciences Panel of the Australian Research Council.  He is currently a member of the extended governing committee of the Gesellschaft fuer Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik.

Kloeden is a Fellow of the Australian Mathematical Society and has served as the editor of several journals. His research interests include applied analysis, probability and stochastics in the context of differential equations, dynamical systems, numerical analysis, and applications in engineering, environmental science, and meteorology and oceanography.

Previous Recipients: 

Please note: The Reid Prize was awarded every other year until 2000.

The W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize Lecturer receives a cash award of $10,000 and an engraved medal.

 

SIAG/APDE Prize

The SIAM Activity Group on Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (SIAG/APDE) Prize, established in 2005, is awarded to the author(s) of the most outstanding paper, as determined by the prize committee, on a topic in partial differential equations published in English in a peer-reviewed journal.

2006 Recipients:  François Golse
                           Université Paris VII – Denis Diderot
                           France

                           Laure Saint-Raymond
                           Université Pierre & Marie Curie
                           France
Photo: Accepting the plaque and certificate for the SIAG/APDE Prize from SIAM President Martin Golubitsky is François Golse (right). Not pictured is co-recipient Laure Saint-Raymond

Citation:  For their paper, “The Navier-Stokes Limit of the Boltzmann Equation for Bounded Collision Kernels,” Inventiones Mathematicae, Volume 155, Number 1 (2004), in recognition of making the definitive connection between weak solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Leray solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation.

François Golse received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Université Paris XIII in 1986, and joined the faculty.  In 1987, he became a Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)  research scientist at the Ecole Normale Superieure.  In 1993, he joined the faculty of the Université Paris VI. In 2006, he was elected Professor of Mathematics at the Ecole  Polytechnique in Paris. Professor Golse is a member of the Institut Universitaire de France and has received several awards, including the Louis Armand Prize from the French Academy of Sciences and the Claude-Antoine Peccot Award from the College of France. His research has focused on the study of problems in mathematical physics, including the Boltzmann equation, the time dependent Hartree-Fock approximation, the distribution of free path lengths in the Lorentz gas, and the fluid dynamic limits of kinetic equations.

Laure Saint-Raymond received her Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the Université Paris VII  in 2000. She joined the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) as a  research scientist in the Laboratoire d'Analyse Numérique, Université Paris VI. In 2002, she became a professor in the Laboratoire J.-L. Lions, Université Paris VI. She has received several awards, including the Louis Armand Prize from the French Academy of Sciences, the Claude-Antoine Peccot Award from the College of France, and the Pius XI Gold Medal from the Pontificia Academia Scientarium. Professor Saint-Raymond's research has focused on the study of charged particles submitted to strong constant external magnetic fields, for example, in tokamaks and plasmas in planetary environments. From a purely mathematical perspective, her interests are in the kinetic theory of rarefied flows and the problems of singular perturbations. This work allows a rigorous multiscale analysis of the motion of plasmas. These results can be easily transposed to problems of rotating fluids subject to the Coriolis force.

The SIAG/APDE Prize presentation, including François Golse’s lecture, From the Boltzmann Equation to Incompressible Hydrodynamic Models, is scheduled as part of the SIAM Conference on Analysis of Partial Differential Equations on Wednesday, July 12, from 2:00 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. in the Georgian Room of the hotel.

This is the first year for this award.

The recipients of the SIAG/APDE Prize receive a plaque and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

 

SIAM Award in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling

The SIAM Award in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling (MCM), established in 1988, is awarded to two of the teams judged “Outstanding” in the annual MCM.  One winning team of students is chosen for each of the problems posed in the MCM.

2006 Recipients:  Problem A, The Continuous Problem: “Positioning and
                           Moving Sprinkler Systems for Irrigation”
                           Solution:  "Sprinkle, Sprinkle, Little Yard”
                           University of Colorado at Boulder
                           Department of Applied Mathematics
                           Boulder, CO

                           Students: Brian Camley, Pascal Getreuer, Bradley Klingenberg
                           Faculty Advisor:  Professor Bengt Fornberg
Photo: Bradley Klingenberg represented his University of Colorado at Boulder team and department by accepting the SIAM Award in the MCM Problem A from SIAM President Martin Golubitsky. Not pictured are team members Brian Camley and Pascal Getreuer


                           Problem B, The Discrete Problem: “Wheelchair Access at Airports”
                           Solution:  "Profit-Maximizing Allocation of Wheelchairs in a
                           Multi-Concourse Airport"
                           Harvard University
                           Department of Mathematics
                           Cambridge, MA
                          
                           Students:  Benjamin Conlee, Neal Gupta, Christopher Yetter
                           Faculty Advisor:  Professor Clifford H. Taubes
Photo: From left: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky with Harvard University team members Benjamin Conlee, Neal Gupta, and Christopher Yetter, who received the SIAM Award in the MCM Problem B

Papers to be presented in a session of Student Day, Tuesday, July 11, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
in the Thoreau Room of the hotel.

SIAM/MCM Award winning teams of the last ten years:

Student recipients each receive $800 (prize and travel), complimentary membership in SIAM for three years, and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate for the students’ schools.

 

SIAM Outstanding Paper Prizes

The prizes, first awarded in 1999, are given for outstanding papers published in SIAM journals during the three years prior to the year of the award.  Papers are selected for their originality:  they bring a fresh look at an existing field or open up new areas of applied mathematics.

2006 Recipients:

“Stabilizability of Stochastic Linear Systems with Finite Feedback Data Rates”
SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, Vol. 43, Issue 2 (2004)
Authors:  
Girish N. Nair, University of Melbourne, Australia
Robin J. Evans, University of Melbourne, Australia

 

“Global Steady-State Controllability of One-Dimensional Semilinear Heat Equations”
SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, Vol. 43, Issue 2 (2004)
Authors: 
Jean-Michel Coron
, Université Paris-Sud, France
Emmanuel Trélat, Université Paris-Sud, France
Photo: Jean-Michel Coron received an Outstanding Paper Prize from SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

 

“The Primal-Dual Active Set Strategy as a Semismooth Newton Method”
SIAM Journal on Optimization, Volume 13, Issue 3 (2003)
Authors:
Michael Hintermüller, University of Graz, Austria
Kazufumi Ito, North Carolina State University
Karl Kunisch, University of Graz, Austria
Photo: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky and Outstanding Paper Prize recipient Michael Hintermüller

Recipients of the SIAM Outstanding Paper Prizes receive a cash prize of $500.

 

SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession

The prize, established in 1985, is in the form of a certificate to be awarded every year at the SIAM Annual Meeting.  It is awarded to an applied mathematician who has made distinguished contributions to the furtherance of applied mathematics on the national level.

2006 Recipient:   Peter D. Lax
                          Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences
                          New York University
Photo: SIAM President Martin Golubitsky presents the SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession to Peter Lax

Citation:  In recognition of his lifetime of leadership and support for the applied and computational mathematics community.  This award expresses SIAM's appreciation for his many services: for his professional service with the national mathematical societies, for his government service on the President's Committee on the National Medal of Science, for his advisory roles in the DOE National Laboratories, and for his vision for the future role of high performance computing and leadership on the National Science Board.

Peter D. Lax received a Ph.D. in mathematics in 1949 from New York University under the direction of Kurt Friedrichs. He joined the faculty of New York University and has spent essentially his entire career at New York University and the Courant Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the recipient of many prizes and awards including the Norbert Wiener Prize, the National Medal of Science, the Wolf Prize, and the Steele Prize. In 2005, he was awarded the prestigious Abel Prize.

Professor Lax laid the foundations for the modern theory of both linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations and has made fundamental contributions to numerical methods for partial differential equations.

Previous Recipients: 

Note: The SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession, previously awarded from time to time, became an annual prize in 2003.

The recipient of the SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession receives a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

 

SIAM Student Paper Prizes

The SIAM Student Paper Prizes are awarded every year to the student author(s) of the most outstanding paper(s) submitted to the SIAM Student Paper Competition. These awards are based solely on the merit and content of the students’ contribution to the submitted papers. The purpose of the SIAM Student Paper Prizes is to recognize outstanding scholarship by students in applied mathematics or computing.

2006 Recipients: 

 

Laurent Demanet
California Institute of Technology
Title:  "The Curvelet Representation of Wave Propagators is Optimally Sparse"      
Co-Author:  Emmanuel J. Candès, California Institute of Technology
Photo: SIAM Student Paper Prize recipient Laurent Demanet with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

 

Emanuele Viola
Harvard University
Title:  "Pseudorandom Bits for Constant Depth Circuits with Few Arbitrary Symmetric Gates"
Photo: SIAM Student Paper Prize recipient Emanuele Viola with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

 

Hongchao Zhang
University of Florida
Title: "A New Active Set Algorithm for Box Constrained Optimization"
Co-Author:  William W. Hager, University of Florida
Photo: SIAM Student Paper Prize recipient Hongchao Zhang with SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

Papers presented in a session of Student Day, Tuesday, July 11, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Thoreau Room of the hotel.

SIAM Student Paper Prize recipients of the last five years:                  

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Recipients of the SIAM Student Paper Prizes receive $1,500 (prize and travel) and framed, hand-calligraphed certificates.

 

The John von Neumann Lecture

Established in 1959, this prize is in the form of an honorarium for an invited lecture.  The lecturer will survey and evaluate a significant and useful contribution to mathematics and its applications.  It may be awarded to a mathematician or to a scientist in another field, but, in either case, the recipient should be one who has made distinguished contributions to pure and/or applied mathematics.

2006 Lecturer:     George Papanicolaou
                          Stanford University

Title of Lecture:   Imaging in Random Media
                         Tuesday, July 11, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
                         Imperial Ballroom
Photo: George Papanicolaou poses with his certificate for The John von Neumann Lecture, accompanied by SIAM President Martin Golubitsky

Citation: In recognition of his wide-ranging development of penetrating analytic and stochastic methods and their application to a broad range of phenomena in the physical, geophysical, and financial sciences.  Specifically, his research on imaging and time reversal in random media, on financial mathematics, and on nonlinear PDEs has been significant and influential.

George Papanicolaou received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, in 1969 and joined the faculty of the Courant Institute. In 1993, he joined the faculty of Stanford University, and, in 1997, he was appointed the Robert Grimmett Professor of Mathematics. He has received an Alfred Sloan Fellowship and a John Guggenheim Fellowship and he is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

His research interests include waves and diffusion in inhomogeneous or random media and in the mathematical analysis of multi-scale phenomena that arise in their study, along with their application to electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere, underwater sound, waves in the lithosphere, diffusion in porous media and, more recently, multi-path effects in communication systems. He also is interested in asymptotics for stochastic equations in analyzing  financial markets and in data analysis.

Previous von Neumann Lecturers:

The John von Neumann Lecturer receives an honorarium of $2,500 and a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate.

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