Author Handbook

Welcome to your guide to SIAM's book publishing program! We are committed to publishing high-quality books of interest to the scientific community at affordable prices. Could one of our next books be yours? Peruse this handbook to learn more about the services we provide to authors and find out how you would benefit from publishing with SIAM.

The Publication Agreement

The publication agreement is a legal document designed to protect both your interests and SIAM’s. It covers the following topics:

Manuscript Length

You and your acquisitions editor should determine the projected page count of your book when the contract is signed. Sometimes the final book ends up longer (or, occasionally, shorter) than expected. This can affect the production schedule and price of the book, so any changes in length should be discussed with your acquisitions editor before submitting the final manuscript.

Copyright

This clause gives SIAM the right to publish your book in its entirety in hard copy and all other media.

Delivery of Manuscript

This clause establishes a due date for your final manuscript. You and your acquisitions editor should set this date, and it should be as realistic as possible. It is important for you to notify your acquisitions editor of any delays since books are scheduled and budgeted a year in advance.

Warranty

This clause states that you take responsibility for securing written permission to reproduce all nonoriginal and/or previously published material.

Royalty

The royalty percentage for your book (in both print and e-book formats) and the date the royalty payment will be made to you are indicated in this clause. Some authors opt to donate all or a portion of their royalties to the Student Travel Fund, and if you have chosen that option it will be indicated as well.

Authors’ Copies

As author, you will receive a number of complimentary copies of your book and be eligible to purchase additional copies at a 40% discount off the list price.

The Components of Your Manuscript

Each author has a unique writing style, or voice, and our editorial staff makes every effort not to change it. However, there are some standards related to manuscript preparation and organization that you should adhere to when writing your book. These include the organization and inclusion of basic manuscript elements (a few will vary, depending on whether the book is authored or edited) and the proper use of SIAM's book macros. This section addresses the elements of the manuscript and the next section will address SIAM's macro.

We also have a SIAM Style Manual that provides information on structure, grammar, and syntax, and our copy editing style. The guidelines are geared toward improving your book's readability and usability and we ask authors to follow it to the extent possible.

SIAM publishes edited books in a range of topics. It is the editor's responsibility to set a consistent style of notation and format for references for all contributors and work closely with the contributors and SIAM to create a cohesive volume.

A complete book typically contains front matter, introduction, main text, and back matter.

Front Matter

The front matter is the material that precedes the main text. It generally contains some or all of the following elements.

  • Half-Title PageThis page, created by SIAM, contains only the main title of the book. Subtitles and author or editor names are omitted.
  • Title Page: This page, also created by SIAM, contains the full title of the book, including the subtitle. The names and affiliations of all authors or editors are included as well.
  • Copyright Page: The copyright page is created by SIAM and always includes the following information:
    • copyright date for the current edition and all previous editions of the book
    • printing information
    • CIP data, which is generated by the Library of Congress and used by librarians to catalog your book
    • SIAM trademark statement
  • The following are optional elements that appear on the copyright page when applicable:
    • the warranty, used primarily for software manuals
    • a credit line for the cover art
    • trademark information for non-SIAM products
    • a statement indicating that all or part of the royalties go to the SIAM Student Travel Fund, when appropriate
  • Series Page: If your book is part of a SIAM series, SIAM creates a page that includes the names of the editor-in-chief and editorial board members. It will also list all the previously published books in the series.
  • Dedication: The dedication is an optional element and is created by SIAM. If you wish to dedicate your book to someone (family members or a mentor, for example), you should supply the appropriate text when submitting your final manuscript.
  • List of Contributors: Edited volumes include an alphabetical listing of the names and affiliations of all contributors to the volume. The book's editor must supply this information at the time the manuscript is submitted to SIAM.
  • Acknowledgments: Acknowledgments to researchers, typists, and other support personnel who aided in the production of your manuscript should be included at the end of the preface. Any grant support received toward work on the book should be acknowledged at the end of the preface.
  • Table of Contents: An exact listing of chapter titles in the order they appear in the book should be included with your manuscript. SIAM's book macros will create the table of contents, which will be finalized by the production editor.
  • Notation and Other Lists: It is helpful to include a list of notation. Some authors include lists of abbreviations or acronyms, tables, figures, and/or algorithms.
  • Foreword: A foreword is a statement about the book by someone other than the author or editor, often an eminent person in the field, a colleague, or mentor. This is an optional element, and you should discuss potential authors for a foreword with your acquisitions editor prior to contacting anyone about preparing one.
  • Preface: The preface is important because it explains your intentions in writing the book, which is important for post-publication reviewers and potential buyers. It outlines the book's purpose, objectives, structure, and the audience for whom it was written. It should be written in the first person and be reader friendly and clear. Keep in mind that you want to make your book sound so appealing that readers will want to purchase it.

    In the preface, clearly identify your primary audience and note what they can hope to gain by reading your book. Tell why you choose to write the book and why you feel the topic is important. If you are writing on a new topic or if your book takes an unconventional or emerging perspective, explain it in simple terms. If you purposefully omitted topics, explain why. Describe the book's special features and material that cannot be found elsewhere. This is also the place to mention supplementary material that is available electronically.

    If your book can be used as a textbook, use part of the preface to indicate specific courses it is meant for and how it could be used. Be sure to list prerequisites.

    At the end of your preface you may include grant information and/or acknowledgments.

Introduction

Some books contain an introductory chapter (for example, textbooks). The primary purpose of the introduction is to explain what material will be covered and how it is organized, and the author usually takes a chapter-by-chapter approach. If the book does not have an introduction, this material can appear in the preface.

At the start of the introduction, you should explain the central topic of your book and give background information on it. It is important to relate the topic to other mathematical areas and to mention recent trends as well as new methods or techniques that you have used. Remember also to include the limitations of these methods or techniques.

Then provide an overview of the book's main features, how it is organized, and how readers can use it most effectively. Give the rationale for the selection of content and choice of organizational style, and provide a one-sentence description of each chapter's contents.

Mention to your readers if you have provided real-life applications of the material in your book or if you have included problems, exercises, and the like. Discuss the hardware and software systems issues that you address or that are used in conjunction with your book.

Main Text

The main text of a book consists of many elements that help organize and give structure to your book, including headings and subheadings, mathematical items (e.g., theorems and lemmas), equations, illustrations, tables, and references. SIAM's book macros take care of numbering and formatting these items for you.

As you prepare to begin writing, please keep in mind there are many good books that contain tips on effective writing. We recommend Handbook of Writing for the Mathematical Sciences, Second Edition by Nicholas J. Higham (SIAM, 1998).

Before you begin and while you are writing, it is important to:

  • determine the readership level to which you are writing
  • review your preface periodically to make sure you have not strayed from your goals
  • keep your notation and reference style consistent throughout the book

The SIAM copy editors will check your text for typos, grammatical errors, mathematical and grammatical inconsistencies (hyphenation, abbreviations, punctuation, etc.), and misspellings. They will try not to change your writing style.

Back Matter

Back matter is material that follows the main text. All back matter should be submitted with the final manuscript. Back matter consists of some or all of the following elements.

  • References: References should be listed after the last chapter of an authored book and at the end of each chapter in an edited volume. SIAM's recommended reference styles are explained in References in the SIAM Book Macro section below. However, it is also acceptable for you to pick a style that is accepted in your field and use it consistently throughout your book. Your references should be as complete and as up to date as possible.
  • Supplemental Readings: Suggestions for additional reading are an asset to any publication—they can provide readers with a wealth of information. As with references, the information you provide about each source should be as complete as possible. Readers often find annotation of supplemental readings helpful.
  • Appendices: Material considered supplementary to the main text should be placed in an appendix. This material is essential but does not fit comfortably within the main part of the text so it does not break the flow of the text for readers. The most common use of an appendix is to present a detailed analysis that would distract the reader if it were given at the point where the results of the analysis were needed. You could also include the following in an appendix: detailed proofs, tables, code, or detailed numerical results.
  • Glossary: The glossary is an alphabetical list of key specialized or technical terms in your field. Definitions should be clear and concise.
  • Index: An index is an essential part of your book because it provides a quick reference for readers seeking a particular topic or key term. A good index greatly enhances the value of a book and is an important aid to the reader. We strongly encourage you to read the SIAM Indexing Guidelines before beginning the index. The key point to remember is that while a search is mechanical, a good index is inferential and requires content expertise. Your readers will rely on your index to guide them not only to important topics but to related ones.

    Supplemental Electronic Material

    Supplemental electronic material (software, data sets, solutions manuals, image banks, etc.) can enhance the value of your book, and SIAM will host this material on an affiliated website. Files for such material should be submitted with your manuscript or shortly thereafter.

    The SIAM Book Macro

    We ask that you adhere to some standards related to manuscript preparation and organization and SIAM's book macro when writing your book.

    The SIAM Macro

    SIAM will supply you with its LaTeX macro files, including a sample book file and instructions for use as you prepare your book manuscript. The macro can be applied after you have written your complete manuscript; however, we encourage you to use our macro from the start to help avoid potential incongruities between your own LaTeX style files and SIAM's. Questions about the macro should be addressed to your acquisitions editor or the developmental editor.

    General Formatting

    The SIAM book macro will format your book to a standard 7-inch x 10-inch trim size, with headings, mathematical items, etc., set in our house style, and it will set the margins and line spacing, so you should not add these commands to your source file. Keep in mind that copyediting will affect page flow, so you should not spend time ensuring that page breaks fall in particular places as you prepare your manuscript for submission. As with all other changes, you will have the opportunity to check the final version, including page and equation layouts.

    Fonts

    SIAM uses the Times font in its books. The SIAM macro uses fonts included with your LaTeX installation as well as the Times package, which is available on several LaTeX depositories. It is best if you prepare your manuscript using our font package from the start, but if you are unable to install these fonts, you will need to comment out the lines of code pertaining to fonts and run your files with the default font (Computer Modern). Your developmental editor will then call in the Times font package after you submit your final manuscript.

    Organization and Numbering

    General Notes

    All numbered items throughout the book should be soft-coded, that is, coded and labeled such that LaTeX can automatically cross-reference them. Hard-coding does not allow for ease in updating cross references and should be avoided at all costs.

    Headings

    Chapters can contain section, subsection, and sub-subsection headings, which should give the reader a clear idea of each chapter's structure.

    Mathematical Items

    Many mathematical items (i.e., theorems, lemmas, corollaries, propositions, definitions, proofs, and algorithms) are defined by SIAM's macros and should not be redefined in your LaTeX files. Items not defined by our macros should be set as described below:

    Item
    Heading Text
    Remark italic
    roman
    Hypothesis italic roman
    Assumption  italic
    roman
    Note italic
    roman
    Example italic
    roman

    Facts, claims, conclusions, conjectures, and results are set up as either theorems or remarks, depending on their use.

    Equations

    Displayed equations will be double numbered by our macro to indicate chapter and occurrence (e.g., equation 4.1).

    Figures and Tables

    Figures and tables will be double numbered by our macro and will be placed as close to their callouts as possible. Please be sure that every figure or table has a callout and explanation within the main text. Please do not use nonspecific citations such as "the figure below" or "the table on this page" since page flow may change.

    Each figure and table should have a brief descriptive caption. If a figure has multiple parts, each part must be explained in the caption.

    Table captions should appear above the table. Figure captions should appear below the figures.

    Note: Figures or tables created by someone other than the author or borrowed from a previously published source, even those created by the author and published elsewhere, must carry an appropriate credit line at the end of the caption.

    Footnotes

    Footnotes should be used sparingly and numbered consecutively throughout the book. Do not use footnotes to refer to publications; instead use reference citations.

    References

    The SIAM book macros set the reference style as follows: bracketed labels consisting of a number or the authors' initials; author first and middle initials and last names; titles of books, articles, etc., in italics; initial capitals for book titles; and commas to separate fields. For journal name abbreviations, please follow the standards set by Mathematical Reviews and, above all, be consistent.

    Although we prefer that you style your reference lists according to the format set by our macros, other reference styles, such as the BibTeX default style, are acceptable. We ask that either the numbered system or the name/date system be used and you are consistent in one format or the other throughout the book. In the numbered system, all references are listed in order of citation (or alphabetical order, if you prefer) and are numbered sequentially beginning with [1]. If a reference is used more than once, the number given to it at the first occurrence should be repeated. Use the bracketed numbers to cite references in the text (e.g., [1], [4]-[6]). In the name/date system, all references are listed in alphabetical order. References are cited in the text using the author's name followed by the year (e.g., [Smith, 1993]). If multiple papers by the same author or set of authors are published in the same year, they should be distinguished by the addition of lowercase letters after the year (e.g., [Smith, 1993a]). Reference citations should not be hard coded.

    Sample References

    [6] B. Fidan, Y. Zhang, and P. A. Ioannou, Adaptive control of a class of slowly time-varying systems with modeling uncertainties, IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, 50: 915-920, 2005.

    [7] P. V. Kokotovic and M. Arcak, Constructive nonlinear control: A historical perspective, Automatica, 37: 637–662, 2001.

    [8] M. Krstic, I. Kanellakopoulos, and P. V. Kokotovic. Nonlinear and Adaptive Control Design, Wiley Interscience, New York, 1995.

    Appendices

    The SIAM book macros will designate the appendices with consecutive capital letters (e.g., Appendix A, Appendix B).

    Index

    Before creating your index, please refer to the SIAM indexing guidelines. These guidelines address the basics of index structure as well as how to use the MakeIndex program to tag your file.

    Figures

    SIAM requires that all illustrations be submitted as EPS or PDF files. The minimum DPI required is 150 except for photographs, in which case it is at least 300. These should be created in black and white unless color art has been approved for the book. Hand-drawn artwork or artwork with hand-written labels will need to be replaced with computer-generated figures.

    You are responsible for adding the input commands for figure files to your LaTeX file. All artwork submitted should be in its final size so that it does not have to be resized in the LaTeX file. When creating figures, quality assurance requires lines or dots that are one point thick or larger—lines thinner than one point may break up or disappear.

    In the case of color art, files should be saved as CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black), not RGB (red, green, blue), format. Although RGB format is acceptable for viewing a color figure on a computer screen, CMYK is the color format necessary for printing high-quality color figures. Your developmental editor can assist you with converting figures from RGB to CMYK if necessary. If your book is planned with black and white art only, it is an option for the electronic version to contain color. In this case, a separate file should be created for the color images. The figures must be named the same as their black and white counterparts.

    Permissions

    As mentioned in your contract, the responsibility for obtaining permission to reproduce previously copyrighted material resides with the author. All permissions should be obtained prior to submitting your manuscript, and you must include copies of all permissions letters with your submission.

    What Needs Permission

    Permission is not needed for substantially altered figures or tables; however, a citation of the original source must be included with such materials. The same rule applies to material based on the ideas of those other than the author.

    In general, it is necessary to obtain permission for figures and tables that have been published in exactly the same form and copyrighted elsewhere. This rule holds true even when you were the original creator of the material. Adaptations of such materials may also require permission, as may reproduction of certain unpublished works. Note that a work does not need to be published to be protected by copyright.

    Fair Use

    Fair use allows the author to quote from other authors' work or to reproduce small amounts of graphic or pictorial material for purposes of review or criticism or to illustrate or buttress their own points.

    Quotations that exceed the fair use doctrine require permission. According to the 15th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style the following factors should be taken into account when determining whether their use is fair:

    • The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes.
    • The nature of the copyrighted work.
    • The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole.
    • The effect of the use on the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

    Obtaining Permissions

    Contact your SIAM book editor if you are unsure whether specific material requires permission.

    In general, you must obtain permission for materials published in the same form and copyrighted elsewhere, such as the following:

    • Illustrations/Figures
    • Tables
    • Photographs (people, works of art, etc.)
    • Charts
    • Text excerpts

    If you have created such material and want to re-use it, you will have to seek the permission of the rights holder, whether that is a publisher or another organization or individual. Adaptations of such materials may also require permission, as may reproductions of certain unpublished works. As mentioned above, a work does not need to be published to be protected by copyright. Theorems and equations are generally not subject to copyright, but attribution is situational.

    Materials published under the Open Access model likely do not require permission but do require standard attribution. Details about Open Access permission guidelines are at Creative Commons. Materials in the public domain require attribution but not permission.

    You must obtain all permissions prior to submitting your manuscript, and you must include copies of all permissions letters with your submission. To obtain permission to use a previously published item, write a letter to the copyright holder, usually the publisher, with complete information about the book you are writing and how the material will be used. A permissions request form is provided for your convenience. If you have any questions about these items, please discuss them with your acquisitions editor.

    RightsLink at Copyright Clearance Center can ease the process for materials published by participating publishers, such as Wiley, Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and others. You can find more information here.

    In most cases permission is granted, but it may take six to eight weeks to hear from the publisher, so you should send your permission requests as early as possible. Some publishers may require exact credit lines, so be sure to follow their instructions word for word.

    You should also be aware that publishers may charge a fee in exchange for allowing you to use their materials. Often, that fee can be reduced or eliminated if you notify the copyright holder of SIAM's not-for-profit status.

    The Production Process

    The production process is made of up of the following steps:

    production process_reducedsize.png

    After you’ve submitted your final manuscript to the acquisitions department, your book will be prepared for production. The developmental and acquisitions editors will contact you with questions pertaining to details that need to be settled prior to transmittal (for example, whether you'd like your photo on the back of the book or what figure or other graphic you'd prefer for the book's cover). After the pre-production questions have been answered, the manuscript is handed over to the book's assigned production editor.

    Shortly after transmittal, SIAM's production manager will create a schedule for your book, and the production editor will send it to you for your approval. The schedule includes dates on which you will receive and return proofs, so it is crucial that you let the production editor know if you have any conflicts due to workload, travel, personal circumstances, etc. In such cases, we will make adjustments to accommodate your schedule.

    At this point, the copyediting of your manuscript will begin. SIAM has a policy of editing for typographical errors, inconsistencies, and house style; however, the editor will not change the tone or "voice" of your manuscript. The production editor will query items that are unclear before making any changes.

    After the copyediting stage, your book manuscript will be given to a compositor who will institute the copyediting changes and produce a clean set of proofs. You will receive proofs of the text, front matter, and cover. Please be aware that at the proof stage only minor changes can be made; no part of the manuscript can be revised or rewritten because doing so would lengthen the production process and increase the cost of preparing the book. You should note that as you are reviewing proofs, your manuscript is also being proofread at SIAM.

    The changes that you return to your production editor will be sent to the compositor, and your production editor will review the second set of proofs to ensure accuracy. If further changes need to be made, the production editor will review a third set of proofs.

    After all changes have been made, the final files of your book will be prepared and sent to the printer for printing and binding. Your finished book will be delivered to SIAM, and you will be sent your complimentary copies.

    Marketing Your Book

    Upon receipt of your final manuscript, your acquisitions editor will send you a copy of SIAM's marketing questionnaire. We ask that you complete this questionnaire as carefully and thoroughly as possible because we use it to create marketing copy and finalize the promotion plan for your book. Our intent is to give your book international visibility and distribution. This section will give you an overview of the various way we market books.

    Print Promotions

    Our promotions (for example: brochures, flyers, and announcements) usually consist of new books and related older publications. Major promotions are done at least three times each year to all SIAM members and nonmember customers who have purchased SIAM books, other societies and publishers, and appropriate organizations. The major promotions typically mail to 40,000 to 50,000 domestic and international individuals. Focused promotions are done on a continual basis in the form of conference exhibits, special flyers, textbook promotions to select faculty, individual book flyers to targeted audiences, space ads, and other efforts aimed at maximizing the visibility of each book.

    A section called "Inside SIAM" is included in most issues of SIAM News. This newsletter provides information on SIAM books, conferences, journals, and membership. The page devoted to books may focus on a particular series or subject area. We always take the opportunity to announce new or forthcoming titles in this section and to promote our backlist.

    Social Media

    SIAM uses social media to promote books, including SIAM's Facebook and Twitter feeds.

    SIAM authors are encouraged to use their own social media accounts to announce their books or speaking engagements. SIAM cannot attend every meeting, but we're happy to share and promote talks on our social media accounts, and we are happy to work with authors in linking to their own blogs or other social media.

    Online Bookstore

    If you go to our online bookstore, you will find categories for new and forthcoming books as well as access to our complete backlist. To find books of interest, you can search for books by author, title, and book series as well as by key word, title, order code, or ISBN.

    Electronic Advertising

    We send announcements of new books to appropriate e-mail bulletin boards and forums that our authors list on the marketing questionnaire. We also have a Book Alerting Service —a list of people interested in electronic notification about our new titles. Those who complete the electronic form, indicating their areas of interest, receive e-mail announcements of new books in those categories.

    Space Ads

    SIAM runs space ads in our own publications (SIAM News, SIAM journals, conference programs, and activity group newsletters) and in appropriate publications of other societies and publishers. Ads are placed based on SIAM's experience with previous books on similar topics, the target markets for the book, and the author's suggestions.

    Announcements

    With the publication of each SIAM book, we contact agents and e-retailers with key book information, including a content summary, so the book can be added to all appropriate databases and websites.

    Book Reviews

    We send a copy of the book to the appropriate technical journals so they can review it. Copies of all reviews are sent to you, and we often use them in future promotions for your book.

    Bookstores

    SIAM books can be found in campus and technical bookstores worldwide. We continue to expand the visibility of SIAM books in bookstores through personal contact and major mailings in both the United States and other countries. Our books are available at online bookstores, primary among them, Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com.

    Conferences

    We display our books at our own conferences as well as at conferences sponsored by other organizations, and we advertise in conference programs. We also send promotional materials to smaller, specialized conferences, meetings, and workshops throughout the world. If an author would like his or her book displayed at one of these small conferences, SIAM will make arrangements with the organizers.

    Package Stuffers

    Most outgoing shipments of books contain flyers and brochures for new publications in similar interest areas.

    Partnership with Eurospan

    SIAM partners with Eurospan Group to optimize international distribution for our overseas members and customers. Since Eurospan is an established presence in other countries, doing business with libraries and bookstores as well as individuals, this partnership ensures our books get maximum exposure outside of North America. Eurospan’s relationship with Amazon.uk and its affiliates ensures that our prices on these sites will be equivalent to domestic prices. SIAM members get their 30% member discount off list price for SIAM books, and all book buyers outside North America receive free shipping on all orders and receive their orders more quickly. 

    Textbook Marketing

    Targeted Promotions

    SIAM contacts professors when a book that is appropriate for a specific course publishes. We also market continuously to department chairs and targeted lists. Examination copies are provided upon request to instructors for course adoption consideration. Follow-up letters are sent to determine how the book was used. Desk copies are provided to professors who adopt a SIAM book for a course.

    Special Student Pricing

    SIAM's Student Discount Pricing Program enables students to buy SIAM textbooks at a reduced rate. SIAM offers 20% off the list price of any SIAM textbook adopted as the primary text in an undergraduate- or graduate-level course. This offer is available only on books ordered directly from SIAM.

    Author Handbook

    Author Handbook

    Welcome to your guide to SIAM's book publishing program! We are committed to publishing high-quality books of interest to the scientific community at affordable prices. Could one of our next books be yours? Peruse this handbook to learn more about the services we provide to authors and find out how you would benefit from publishing with SIAM.

    The Publication Agreement

    The publication agreement is a legal document designed to protect both your interests and SIAM’s. It covers the following topics:

    Manuscript Length

    You and your acquisitions editor should determine the projected page count of your book when the contract is signed. Sometimes the final book ends up longer (or, occasionally, shorter) than expected. This can affect the production schedule and price of the book, so any changes in length should be discussed with your acquisitions editor before submitting the final manuscript.

    Copyright

    This clause gives SIAM the right to publish your book in its entirety in hard copy and all other media.

    Delivery of Manuscript

    This clause establishes a due date for your final manuscript. You and your acquisitions editor should set this date, and it should be as realistic as possible. It is important for you to notify your acquisitions editor of any delays since books are scheduled and budgeted a year in advance.

    Warranty

    This clause states that you take responsibility for securing written permission to reproduce all nonoriginal and/or previously published material.

    Royalty

    The royalty percentage for your book (in both print and e-book formats) and the date the royalty payment will be made to you are indicated in this clause. Some authors opt to donate all or a portion of their royalties to the Student Travel Fund, and if you have chosen that option it will be indicated as well.

    Authors’ Copies

    As author, you will receive a number of complimentary copies of your book and be eligible to purchase additional copies at a 40% discount off the list price.

    The Components of Your Manuscript

    Each author has a unique writing style, or voice, and our editorial staff makes every effort not to change it. However, there are some standards related to manuscript preparation and organization that you should adhere to when writing your book. These include the organization and inclusion of basic manuscript elements (a few will vary, depending on whether the book is authored or edited) and the proper use of SIAM's book macros. This section addresses the elements of the manuscript and the next section will address SIAM's macro.

    We also have a SIAM Style Manual that provides information on structure, grammar, and syntax, and our copy editing style. The guidelines are geared toward improving your book's readability and usability and we ask authors to follow it to the extent possible.

    SIAM publishes edited books in a range of topics. It is the editor's responsibility to set a consistent style of notation and format for references for all contributors and work closely with the contributors and SIAM to create a cohesive volume.

    A complete book typically contains front matter, introduction, main text, and back matter.

    Front Matter

    The front matter is the material that precedes the main text. It generally contains some or all of the following elements.

    • Half-Title PageThis page, created by SIAM, contains only the main title of the book. Subtitles and author or editor names are omitted.
    • Title Page: This page, also created by SIAM, contains the full title of the book, including the subtitle. The names and affiliations of all authors or editors are included as well.
    • Copyright Page: The copyright page is created by SIAM and always includes the following information:
      • copyright date for the current edition and all previous editions of the book
      • printing information
      • CIP data, which is generated by the Library of Congress and used by librarians to catalog your book
      • SIAM trademark statement
    • The following are optional elements that appear on the copyright page when applicable:
      • the warranty, used primarily for software manuals
      • a credit line for the cover art
      • trademark information for non-SIAM products
      • a statement indicating that all or part of the royalties go to the SIAM Student Travel Fund, when appropriate
    • Series Page: If your book is part of a SIAM series, SIAM creates a page that includes the names of the editor-in-chief and editorial board members. It will also list all the previously published books in the series.
    • Dedication: The dedication is an optional element and is created by SIAM. If you wish to dedicate your book to someone (family members or a mentor, for example), you should supply the appropriate text when submitting your final manuscript.
    • List of Contributors: Edited volumes include an alphabetical listing of the names and affiliations of all contributors to the volume. The book's editor must supply this information at the time the manuscript is submitted to SIAM.
    • Acknowledgments: Acknowledgments to researchers, typists, and other support personnel who aided in the production of your manuscript should be included at the end of the preface. Any grant support received toward work on the book should be acknowledged at the end of the preface.
    • Table of Contents: An exact listing of chapter titles in the order they appear in the book should be included with your manuscript. SIAM's book macros will create the table of contents, which will be finalized by the production editor.
    • Notation and Other Lists: It is helpful to include a list of notation. Some authors include lists of abbreviations or acronyms, tables, figures, and/or algorithms.
    • Foreword: A foreword is a statement about the book by someone other than the author or editor, often an eminent person in the field, a colleague, or mentor. This is an optional element, and you should discuss potential authors for a foreword with your acquisitions editor prior to contacting anyone about preparing one.
    • Preface: The preface is important because it explains your intentions in writing the book, which is important for post-publication reviewers and potential buyers. It outlines the book's purpose, objectives, structure, and the audience for whom it was written. It should be written in the first person and be reader friendly and clear. Keep in mind that you want to make your book sound so appealing that readers will want to purchase it.

      In the preface, clearly identify your primary audience and note what they can hope to gain by reading your book. Tell why you choose to write the book and why you feel the topic is important. If you are writing on a new topic or if your book takes an unconventional or emerging perspective, explain it in simple terms. If you purposefully omitted topics, explain why. Describe the book's special features and material that cannot be found elsewhere. This is also the place to mention supplementary material that is available electronically.

      If your book can be used as a textbook, use part of the preface to indicate specific courses it is meant for and how it could be used. Be sure to list prerequisites.

      At the end of your preface you may include grant information and/or acknowledgments.

    Introduction

    Some books contain an introductory chapter (for example, textbooks). The primary purpose of the introduction is to explain what material will be covered and how it is organized, and the author usually takes a chapter-by-chapter approach. If the book does not have an introduction, this material can appear in the preface.

    At the start of the introduction, you should explain the central topic of your book and give background information on it. It is important to relate the topic to other mathematical areas and to mention recent trends as well as new methods or techniques that you have used. Remember also to include the limitations of these methods or techniques.

    Then provide an overview of the book's main features, how it is organized, and how readers can use it most effectively. Give the rationale for the selection of content and choice of organizational style, and provide a one-sentence description of each chapter's contents.

    Mention to your readers if you have provided real-life applications of the material in your book or if you have included problems, exercises, and the like. Discuss the hardware and software systems issues that you address or that are used in conjunction with your book.

    Main Text

    The main text of a book consists of many elements that help organize and give structure to your book, including headings and subheadings, mathematical items (e.g., theorems and lemmas), equations, illustrations, tables, and references. SIAM's book macros take care of numbering and formatting these items for you.

    As you prepare to begin writing, please keep in mind there are many good books that contain tips on effective writing. We recommend Handbook of Writing for the Mathematical Sciences, Second Edition by Nicholas J. Higham (SIAM, 1998).

    Before you begin and while you are writing, it is important to:

    • determine the readership level to which you are writing
    • review your preface periodically to make sure you have not strayed from your goals
    • keep your notation and reference style consistent throughout the book

    The SIAM copy editors will check your text for typos, grammatical errors, mathematical and grammatical inconsistencies (hyphenation, abbreviations, punctuation, etc.), and misspellings. They will try not to change your writing style.

    Back Matter

    Back matter is material that follows the main text. All back matter should be submitted with the final manuscript. Back matter consists of some or all of the following elements.

    • References: References should be listed after the last chapter of an authored book and at the end of each chapter in an edited volume. SIAM's recommended reference styles are explained in References in the SIAM Book Macro section below. However, it is also acceptable for you to pick a style that is accepted in your field and use it consistently throughout your book. Your references should be as complete and as up to date as possible.
    • Supplemental Readings: Suggestions for additional reading are an asset to any publication—they can provide readers with a wealth of information. As with references, the information you provide about each source should be as complete as possible. Readers often find annotation of supplemental readings helpful.
    • Appendices: Material considered supplementary to the main text should be placed in an appendix. This material is essential but does not fit comfortably within the main part of the text so it does not break the flow of the text for readers. The most common use of an appendix is to present a detailed analysis that would distract the reader if it were given at the point where the results of the analysis were needed. You could also include the following in an appendix: detailed proofs, tables, code, or detailed numerical results.
    • Glossary: The glossary is an alphabetical list of key specialized or technical terms in your field. Definitions should be clear and concise.
    • Index: An index is an essential part of your book because it provides a quick reference for readers seeking a particular topic or key term. A good index greatly enhances the value of a book and is an important aid to the reader. We strongly encourage you to read the SIAM Indexing Guidelines before beginning the index. The key point to remember is that while a search is mechanical, a good index is inferential and requires content expertise. Your readers will rely on your index to guide them not only to important topics but to related ones.

      Supplemental Electronic Material

      Supplemental electronic material (software, data sets, solutions manuals, image banks, etc.) can enhance the value of your book, and SIAM will host this material on an affiliated website. Files for such material should be submitted with your manuscript or shortly thereafter.

      The SIAM Book Macro

      We ask that you adhere to some standards related to manuscript preparation and organization and SIAM's book macro when writing your book.

      The SIAM Macro

      SIAM will supply you with its LaTeX macro files, including a sample book file and instructions for use as you prepare your book manuscript. The macro can be applied after you have written your complete manuscript; however, we encourage you to use our macro from the start to help avoid potential incongruities between your own LaTeX style files and SIAM's. Questions about the macro should be addressed to your acquisitions editor or the developmental editor.

      General Formatting

      The SIAM book macro will format your book to a standard 7-inch x 10-inch trim size, with headings, mathematical items, etc., set in our house style, and it will set the margins and line spacing, so you should not add these commands to your source file. Keep in mind that copyediting will affect page flow, so you should not spend time ensuring that page breaks fall in particular places as you prepare your manuscript for submission. As with all other changes, you will have the opportunity to check the final version, including page and equation layouts.

      Fonts

      SIAM uses the Times font in its books. The SIAM macro uses fonts included with your LaTeX installation as well as the Times package, which is available on several LaTeX depositories. It is best if you prepare your manuscript using our font package from the start, but if you are unable to install these fonts, you will need to comment out the lines of code pertaining to fonts and run your files with the default font (Computer Modern). Your developmental editor will then call in the Times font package after you submit your final manuscript.

      Organization and Numbering

      General Notes

      All numbered items throughout the book should be soft-coded, that is, coded and labeled such that LaTeX can automatically cross-reference them. Hard-coding does not allow for ease in updating cross references and should be avoided at all costs.

      Headings

      Chapters can contain section, subsection, and sub-subsection headings, which should give the reader a clear idea of each chapter's structure.

      Mathematical Items

      Many mathematical items (i.e., theorems, lemmas, corollaries, propositions, definitions, proofs, and algorithms) are defined by SIAM's macros and should not be redefined in your LaTeX files. Items not defined by our macros should be set as described below:

      Item
      Heading Text
      Remark italic
      roman
      Hypothesis italic roman
      Assumption  italic
      roman
      Note italic
      roman
      Example italic
      roman

      Facts, claims, conclusions, conjectures, and results are set up as either theorems or remarks, depending on their use.

      Equations

      Displayed equations will be double numbered by our macro to indicate chapter and occurrence (e.g., equation 4.1).

      Figures and Tables

      Figures and tables will be double numbered by our macro and will be placed as close to their callouts as possible. Please be sure that every figure or table has a callout and explanation within the main text. Please do not use nonspecific citations such as "the figure below" or "the table on this page" since page flow may change.

      Each figure and table should have a brief descriptive caption. If a figure has multiple parts, each part must be explained in the caption.

      Table captions should appear above the table. Figure captions should appear below the figures.

      Note: Figures or tables created by someone other than the author or borrowed from a previously published source, even those created by the author and published elsewhere, must carry an appropriate credit line at the end of the caption.

      Footnotes

      Footnotes should be used sparingly and numbered consecutively throughout the book. Do not use footnotes to refer to publications; instead use reference citations.

      References

      The SIAM book macros set the reference style as follows: bracketed labels consisting of a number or the authors' initials; author first and middle initials and last names; titles of books, articles, etc., in italics; initial capitals for book titles; and commas to separate fields. For journal name abbreviations, please follow the standards set by Mathematical Reviews and, above all, be consistent.

      Although we prefer that you style your reference lists according to the format set by our macros, other reference styles, such as the BibTeX default style, are acceptable. We ask that either the numbered system or the name/date system be used and you are consistent in one format or the other throughout the book. In the numbered system, all references are listed in order of citation (or alphabetical order, if you prefer) and are numbered sequentially beginning with [1]. If a reference is used more than once, the number given to it at the first occurrence should be repeated. Use the bracketed numbers to cite references in the text (e.g., [1], [4]-[6]). In the name/date system, all references are listed in alphabetical order. References are cited in the text using the author's name followed by the year (e.g., [Smith, 1993]). If multiple papers by the same author or set of authors are published in the same year, they should be distinguished by the addition of lowercase letters after the year (e.g., [Smith, 1993a]). Reference citations should not be hard coded.

      Sample References

      [6] B. Fidan, Y. Zhang, and P. A. Ioannou, Adaptive control of a class of slowly time-varying systems with modeling uncertainties, IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, 50: 915-920, 2005.

      [7] P. V. Kokotovic and M. Arcak, Constructive nonlinear control: A historical perspective, Automatica, 37: 637–662, 2001.

      [8] M. Krstic, I. Kanellakopoulos, and P. V. Kokotovic. Nonlinear and Adaptive Control Design, Wiley Interscience, New York, 1995.

      Appendices

      The SIAM book macros will designate the appendices with consecutive capital letters (e.g., Appendix A, Appendix B).

      Index

      Before creating your index, please refer to the SIAM indexing guidelines. These guidelines address the basics of index structure as well as how to use the MakeIndex program to tag your file.

      Figures

      SIAM requires that all illustrations be submitted as EPS or PDF files. The minimum DPI required is 150 except for photographs, in which case it is at least 300. These should be created in black and white unless color art has been approved for the book. Hand-drawn artwork or artwork with hand-written labels will need to be replaced with computer-generated figures.

      You are responsible for adding the input commands for figure files to your LaTeX file. All artwork submitted should be in its final size so that it does not have to be resized in the LaTeX file. When creating figures, quality assurance requires lines or dots that are one point thick or larger—lines thinner than one point may break up or disappear.

      In the case of color art, files should be saved as CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black), not RGB (red, green, blue), format. Although RGB format is acceptable for viewing a color figure on a computer screen, CMYK is the color format necessary for printing high-quality color figures. Your developmental editor can assist you with converting figures from RGB to CMYK if necessary. If your book is planned with black and white art only, it is an option for the electronic version to contain color. In this case, a separate file should be created for the color images. The figures must be named the same as their black and white counterparts.

      Permissions

      As mentioned in your contract, the responsibility for obtaining permission to reproduce previously copyrighted material resides with the author. All permissions should be obtained prior to submitting your manuscript, and you must include copies of all permissions letters with your submission.

      What Needs Permission

      Permission is not needed for substantially altered figures or tables; however, a citation of the original source must be included with such materials. The same rule applies to material based on the ideas of those other than the author.

      In general, it is necessary to obtain permission for figures and tables that have been published in exactly the same form and copyrighted elsewhere. This rule holds true even when you were the original creator of the material. Adaptations of such materials may also require permission, as may reproduction of certain unpublished works. Note that a work does not need to be published to be protected by copyright.

      Fair Use

      Fair use allows the author to quote from other authors' work or to reproduce small amounts of graphic or pictorial material for purposes of review or criticism or to illustrate or buttress their own points.

      Quotations that exceed the fair use doctrine require permission. According to the 15th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style the following factors should be taken into account when determining whether their use is fair:

      • The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes.
      • The nature of the copyrighted work.
      • The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole.
      • The effect of the use on the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

      Obtaining Permissions

      Contact your SIAM book editor if you are unsure whether specific material requires permission.

      In general, you must obtain permission for materials published in the same form and copyrighted elsewhere, such as the following:

      • Illustrations/Figures
      • Tables
      • Photographs (people, works of art, etc.)
      • Charts
      • Text excerpts

      If you have created such material and want to re-use it, you will have to seek the permission of the rights holder, whether that is a publisher or another organization or individual. Adaptations of such materials may also require permission, as may reproductions of certain unpublished works. As mentioned above, a work does not need to be published to be protected by copyright. Theorems and equations are generally not subject to copyright, but attribution is situational.

      Materials published under the Open Access model likely do not require permission but do require standard attribution. Details about Open Access permission guidelines are at Creative Commons. Materials in the public domain require attribution but not permission.

      You must obtain all permissions prior to submitting your manuscript, and you must include copies of all permissions letters with your submission. To obtain permission to use a previously published item, write a letter to the copyright holder, usually the publisher, with complete information about the book you are writing and how the material will be used. A permissions request form is provided for your convenience. If you have any questions about these items, please discuss them with your acquisitions editor.

      RightsLink at Copyright Clearance Center can ease the process for materials published by participating publishers, such as Wiley, Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and others. You can find more information here.

      In most cases permission is granted, but it may take six to eight weeks to hear from the publisher, so you should send your permission requests as early as possible. Some publishers may require exact credit lines, so be sure to follow their instructions word for word.

      You should also be aware that publishers may charge a fee in exchange for allowing you to use their materials. Often, that fee can be reduced or eliminated if you notify the copyright holder of SIAM's not-for-profit status.

      The Production Process

      The production process is made of up of the following steps:

      production process_reducedsize.png

      After you’ve submitted your final manuscript to the acquisitions department, your book will be prepared for production. The developmental and acquisitions editors will contact you with questions pertaining to details that need to be settled prior to transmittal (for example, whether you'd like your photo on the back of the book or what figure or other graphic you'd prefer for the book's cover). After the pre-production questions have been answered, the manuscript is handed over to the book's assigned production editor.

      Shortly after transmittal, SIAM's production manager will create a schedule for your book, and the production editor will send it to you for your approval. The schedule includes dates on which you will receive and return proofs, so it is crucial that you let the production editor know if you have any conflicts due to workload, travel, personal circumstances, etc. In such cases, we will make adjustments to accommodate your schedule.

      At this point, the copyediting of your manuscript will begin. SIAM has a policy of editing for typographical errors, inconsistencies, and house style; however, the editor will not change the tone or "voice" of your manuscript. The production editor will query items that are unclear before making any changes.

      After the copyediting stage, your book manuscript will be given to a compositor who will institute the copyediting changes and produce a clean set of proofs. You will receive proofs of the text, front matter, and cover. Please be aware that at the proof stage only minor changes can be made; no part of the manuscript can be revised or rewritten because doing so would lengthen the production process and increase the cost of preparing the book. You should note that as you are reviewing proofs, your manuscript is also being proofread at SIAM.

      The changes that you return to your production editor will be sent to the compositor, and your production editor will review the second set of proofs to ensure accuracy. If further changes need to be made, the production editor will review a third set of proofs.

      After all changes have been made, the final files of your book will be prepared and sent to the printer for printing and binding. Your finished book will be delivered to SIAM, and you will be sent your complimentary copies.

      Marketing Your Book

      Upon receipt of your final manuscript, your acquisitions editor will send you a copy of SIAM's marketing questionnaire. We ask that you complete this questionnaire as carefully and thoroughly as possible because we use it to create marketing copy and finalize the promotion plan for your book. Our intent is to give your book international visibility and distribution. This section will give you an overview of the various way we market books.

      Print Promotions

      Our promotions (for example: brochures, flyers, and announcements) usually consist of new books and related older publications. Major promotions are done at least three times each year to all SIAM members and nonmember customers who have purchased SIAM books, other societies and publishers, and appropriate organizations. The major promotions typically mail to 40,000 to 50,000 domestic and international individuals. Focused promotions are done on a continual basis in the form of conference exhibits, special flyers, textbook promotions to select faculty, individual book flyers to targeted audiences, space ads, and other efforts aimed at maximizing the visibility of each book.

      A section called "Inside SIAM" is included in most issues of SIAM News. This newsletter provides information on SIAM books, conferences, journals, and membership. The page devoted to books may focus on a particular series or subject area. We always take the opportunity to announce new or forthcoming titles in this section and to promote our backlist.

      Social Media

      SIAM uses social media to promote books, including SIAM's Facebook and Twitter feeds.

      SIAM authors are encouraged to use their own social media accounts to announce their books or speaking engagements. SIAM cannot attend every meeting, but we're happy to share and promote talks on our social media accounts, and we are happy to work with authors in linking to their own blogs or other social media.

      Online Bookstore

      If you go to our online bookstore, you will find categories for new and forthcoming books as well as access to our complete backlist. To find books of interest, you can search for books by author, title, and book series as well as by key word, title, order code, or ISBN.

      Electronic Advertising

      We send announcements of new books to appropriate e-mail bulletin boards and forums that our authors list on the marketing questionnaire. We also have a Book Alerting Service —a list of people interested in electronic notification about our new titles. Those who complete the electronic form, indicating their areas of interest, receive e-mail announcements of new books in those categories.

      Space Ads

      SIAM runs space ads in our own publications (SIAM News, SIAM journals, conference programs, and activity group newsletters) and in appropriate publications of other societies and publishers. Ads are placed based on SIAM's experience with previous books on similar topics, the target markets for the book, and the author's suggestions.

      Announcements

      With the publication of each SIAM book, we contact agents and e-retailers with key book information, including a content summary, so the book can be added to all appropriate databases and websites.

      Book Reviews

      We send a copy of the book to the appropriate technical journals so they can review it. Copies of all reviews are sent to you, and we often use them in future promotions for your book.

      Bookstores

      SIAM books can be found in campus and technical bookstores worldwide. We continue to expand the visibility of SIAM books in bookstores through personal contact and major mailings in both the United States and other countries. Our books are available at online bookstores, primary among them, Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com.

      Conferences

      We display our books at our own conferences as well as at conferences sponsored by other organizations, and we advertise in conference programs. We also send promotional materials to smaller, specialized conferences, meetings, and workshops throughout the world. If an author would like his or her book displayed at one of these small conferences, SIAM will make arrangements with the organizers.

      Package Stuffers

      Most outgoing shipments of books contain flyers and brochures for new publications in similar interest areas.

      Partnership with Eurospan

      SIAM partners with Eurospan Group to optimize international distribution for our overseas members and customers. Since Eurospan is an established presence in other countries, doing business with libraries and bookstores as well as individuals, this partnership ensures our books get maximum exposure outside of North America. Eurospan’s relationship with Amazon.uk and its affiliates ensures that our prices on these sites will be equivalent to domestic prices. SIAM members get their 30% member discount off list price for SIAM books, and all book buyers outside North America receive free shipping on all orders and receive their orders more quickly. 

      Textbook Marketing

      Targeted Promotions

      SIAM contacts professors when a book that is appropriate for a specific course publishes. We also market continuously to department chairs and targeted lists. Examination copies are provided upon request to instructors for course adoption consideration. Follow-up letters are sent to determine how the book was used. Desk copies are provided to professors who adopt a SIAM book for a course.

      Special Student Pricing

      SIAM's Student Discount Pricing Program enables students to buy SIAM textbooks at a reduced rate. SIAM offers 20% off the list price of any SIAM textbook adopted as the primary text in an undergraduate- or graduate-level course. This offer is available only on books ordered directly from SIAM.

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